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Meditations


Come along and meet old and new friends.....

'There are no strangers here; Only friends you haven't yet met'. W. B. Yeats

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Bernadette shares this video of the sights and sounds at Bective Spring Equinox 2019

The Meditation Experience

Physics informs us everything is composed of energetic particles, and these are continually interacting. This means that we and the energy around us is flowing and exchanging continually – the eastern traditions call it chi.

Some people sense these energies and changes more strongly than others. When we walk into a room or meet other people we interact with the energy of the room or person – there may be a feeling of homeliness and comfort or sometimes a feeling of disturbance, of something not 'right'. We are endlessly picking up information about a place and whatever is in the space whether we consciously realise this or not.

Setting the meditation space

Those that arrive first on the evening or the person 'leading' the evening set the ambience of the room with candles, lower the lights and often place a central candle or items that have pleasant associations for us. Whilst doing this we have an attitude of blessing the room and those that will be present. We set the intention that everything occurring during the evening is for the highest good of all.

Centering yourself on arrival

To be in balance with the room and all those in meditation with you, you can use this short exercise of centering: Close your eyes, take three deep breaths and relax. Feel your whole body in a restful state then imagine a central light somewhere in your body, it doesn't matter where – maybe your head, your heart area or around your navel.

Having established this place of light within you, you now place your attention above your head and 'see' a beautiful warm sun shining brightly. From this a golden thread of light emerges and links, through the top of your head, to the light within you. Next you imagine this light leaving your body through the soles of your feet and going deep into the earth, to the core. Be aware of the linking of yourself between the outer sun, your inner light and the centre of the earth.

Having set up your connections now imagine you are sitting in a bubble of white, blue or gold light, and that this extends about two feet from your body. Imagine expanding and contracting this light until you feel a state of comfort. You can also imagine changing it from being stationary to spinning around you. Once you have done this exercise a few times it becomes almost automatic.

Closing the meditation

With this understanding that we have been in an altered state of being, it is obvious that a meditation should be ended calmly and slowly, as different people have different experiences and we need to make sure by the end of the evening that all are back in their Beta state. It is good to bring the experience of the meditation into your consciousness of everyday life but not to be 'up in the air' with it. We do this by 'grounding'. Often we have become so accustomed to the Theta brainwave pattern that we do not recognise within ourselves that we are not in a Beta state.

We thus send a message to the brain and body that we need to be able to react and respond to the world of everyday life by doing something physical. We may ring a bell, physically touch the floor, rub our hands together and tap over your body to awaken your muscles and circulation. This is an important part of the meditation experience.

It is also a good idea to re-affirm your place on the earth by imagining yourself in the bubble of white, blue or gold light. We finish the meditation and healing evening with a drink which supports the grounding process.

Pinterest Ideas - Click here for our Pinterest Board on ideas and thoughts on meditation

Bective

There are records of a Mill being in the area since the heyday of the Abbey, but the history is a bit clouded in mystery. Bective Abbey, sited on a gentle rise above the River Boyne, was established by the Cistercians in 1147. Dedicated to the Virgin Mary it's walls are mainly intact, with beautiful cloisters and other rooms to explore. Recent archaeological excavations have revealed extensive monastic gardens and further buildings probably used by the monks and lay brothers.

The Cistercians owned many granges (farms) and were commercially successful in managing the landscape. Based in France they searched for noble patrons and prime farmland. At Bective they found rich lush pastureland and Murchadh O Melaghlin, King of Meath, and at his invitation they moved into the area and took over the local farms, then employing the owners in the service of the monastery. Austere and requiring strict conformance to the Rules of St. Benedict, their observance included manual work and agricultural labour in the fields of the Abbey. In 1536 Bective was dissolved on the orders of Henry VIII and the community dispersed to live with the locals.

Despite having been restrained in the energy of this powerful management by Christian monks many find a peaceful atmosphere and calmness in the semi- ruined buildings.

There is a small car park and information boards at the Abbey site.